Author Laura Lee Discusses Oscar Wilde and her New Book “Oscar’s Ghost”

Tuesday October 17, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Years after Oscar Wilde’s death, two of his closest friends, Lord Alfred Douglas and his literary executor Robert Ross—both former lovers—engaged in a bitter battle over Wilde’s legacy and who was to blame for his downfall and early death. The centerpiece of the conflict was Ross’s handling of Wilde’s prison manuscript, De Profundis.

The furious struggle led to stalking, blackmail, witness tampering, prison, and a series of dramatic lawsuits. The feud had long-lasting repercussions, not only for the two men, but also for how we remember Oscar Wilde today.

Join author Laura Lee as she discusses this fascinating story, the subject of her new book Oscar’s Ghost.

Laura Lee is the author of 20 books including fiction, non-fiction and children's literature. She lives in Rochester, MI and divides her time between writing and touring the country with a ballet master class project. Oscar's Ghost is the result of six years of research into Oscar Wilde and his circle.

This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

From Stigma to Strength: Rethinking How We Do Diversity

Wednesday October 18, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Attempts at enhancing diversity often begin with a notion of enhancing tolerance for a minority group, resulting in ongoing senses of both disenfranchisement by the minority group and resentment by members of the dominant group.

Join Mira Charlotte Krishnan as she examines opportunities to move from reactive to strategic to a new kind of essential diversity approach by examining the rise of the multicultural workplace, the rise of autistic people and in the world of work, the rise of women and gender and sexual diversity.

Reactive diversity increases fairness while producing existing outcomes. Strategic diversity optimizes those existing outcomes.

The goal of essential diversity, however, is to enable new outcomes altogether. These outcomes are only identified via co-creation among diverse groups, and are only possible when diversity is not a tool or a fundamental principle, but the source or driving force which causes the organization to exist.
Mira Krishnan is a social entrepreneur and feminist activist, passionate about the lives of girls and women, early childhood development, and sustainable communities

This event is a partnership with UM Investing in Ability and is part of Investing In Ability Week 2017: Diversity Includes Disability.

An Evening of Mystery Authors: Aunt Agatha's Mystery Bookstore Celebrates 25 Years

Thursday October 19, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event will be recorded

Aunt Agatha's Mystery Bookstore celebrate their 25th anniversary with this special AADL event featuring mystery authors William Kent Krueger (and his new mystery Sulfur Springs) and Julia Keller ( with her latest, Fast Falls The Night). The authors will discuss their new books and the mystery genre.

William Kent Krueger has received many awards, including the Minnesota Book Award, the Loft-McKnight Fiction Award, the Anthony Award, the Barry Award, the Dilys Award, and the Friends of American Writers Prize. His last seven novels were all New York Times bestsellers. He writes a mystery series set in the north woods of Minnesota. His protagonist is Cork O’Connor, the former sheriff of Tamarack County and a man of mixed heritage—part Irish and part Ojibwe. Sulfur Springs is number sixteen in the Cork O’Connor series.

Julia Keller won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing for a three-part narrative series about the aftermath of a deadly tornado and the randomness of fate. Her books include Mr. Gatling’s Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It, Richard Jordan Gatling: Back Home and the Bell Elkins mystery series, set in Acker’s Gap, West Virginia. The newest in the series, Fast Falls The Night is based on a real-life event and takes place in a single 24-hour period, unfurling against the backdrop of a shattering personal revelation that will change Bell Elkins' life forever.

This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

Bruce Winslow Discusses His Work and Presents Awards for the AAWA Fall 2017 Juried Exhibition

Friday October 20, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In conjunction with their annual exhibition, the Ann Arbor Women Artists join with the Library to present this lecture by Bruce Winslow, artist, former director of the Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art, and the juror for the Fall 2017 exhibit at the Library. Winners of this juried exhibition will also be announced.

The evening will begin with a 6:30 pm reception, where the public is invited to view the exhibition before the lecture and awards presentation.

A Midland native, Bruce Winslow is a graduate of Central Michigan University (BFA) and the Pratt Institute (MFA) in Brooklyn, New York. He began working at the Midland Center for the Arts in 1988 managing studio tours, quickly moved into public relations. He became interim director in 1997 and was the director until his retirement in January 2017. Winslow paints large, improvisational abstract oils and has participated in many group and solo exhibitions. He has taught studio art and college-level art history.

Ann Arbor Women Artists is a non-profit organization of approximately 330+ women and men with connections to Ann Arbor, ranging from beginning to professional artists. The purpose of the AAWA is to stimulate creative expression and sharing among its members in order to continually raise the quality of the art produced.

Each calendar year the AAWA holds two or three juried shows. A juror is invited to select from a large group of submissions a final show that is a reflection of the body of work produced by the membership which ranges from beginning to professional artist.

Halloween Costume Swap

Sunday October 22, 2017: 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room and Downtown Library: Secret Lab

This event is intended for all ages.

Come pick out a new-to-you costume for this year! We'll also be doing a kids' craft!

This is a wonderful chance to save money, clear your closet, and pick out something snazzy for this year from the gently used and clean costumes dropped off at any Library Branch during the month of October.

Breaking the Stress Cycle from Childhood to Adulthood

Monday October 23, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event will be recorded

The U.S. is experiencing a widespread and growing stress epidemic. Stress related disorders and diseases have been on the rise for decades according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. National surveys that assess how stressed and anxious we feel show a very similar pattern. And it shows up in our bodies, even before we get sick: the “physiological stress load” that tracks key biological markers shows similar increases, and is getting worse as each new age group enters adulthood. More children and youth may also be experiencing greater stress dysregulation and difficulties in coping, owing to the lifelong impact of early life adversity that is tied biologically and psychologically to this epidemic.

Join Dr. Daniel P. Keating for a fascinating evening as he discusses that research shows how we can break this cycle, both for individuals and families at every stage of development, and for society more generally.

Dr. Keating is currently Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, and Pediatrics, and Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His current research focuses on the impact of early life adversity on child and youth development, and on the neurodevelopmental pathways in adolescent risk behavior. His most recent book is Born Anxious: The Lifelong Impact of Early Life Adversity – and How to Break the Cycle.

This program is part of the "Exploring the Mind" series and is a partnership with The University of Michigan Department of Psychology

A Look Inside the Yellow Room Gang

Tuesday October 24, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

The Yellow Room Gang is a collective of eight area singer-songwriters who meet monthly in the yellow-painted living room of David Tamulevich’s Ann Arbor home to work out new songs.

Enjoy this chance to be a part of one of those meetings, look into the songwriting process of these local favorites and be among the first to hear their songs in the making.

Doug Stanton Discusses His New Book: "The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 TET Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War"

Wednesday October 25, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

On January 31st, 1968 as many as 100,000 North Vietnamese soldiers attacked thirty-six cities throughout South Vietnam in an attack known as the Tet Offensive. This attack was a turning point in the decade-long war that led to, among other things, LBJ’s decision not to run for re-election. It was a national watershed moment, but for 19-year-old Stan Parker and the young men of the US Army’s recon platoon, Echo Company of the 101st Airborne Division, the attack was the start of a brutal fight for survival.

As we approach the 50th Anniversary of the Tet Offensive, The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1968 TET Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War offers a breathtaking portrait of war, homecoming, and a search for peace.

More than ten years in the making, and based on hours of interviews with soldiers, detailed letters written to and from Echo Company, Pentagon after-action reports, photographs and video footage, this new book by the New York Times bestselling author of In Harm’s Way and Horse Soldiers offers the untold and remarkable story of a platoon of American soldiers and their heroic efforts to survive the Vietnam War – both on the battlefield and after their return home to the US.

Doug Stanton is a journalist, lecturer, screenwriter, and author who has appeared on numerous TV and radio outlets, including NBC’s “Today,” CNN, Imus In The Morning, Discovery, A&E, Fox News, NPR, MSNBC’s Morning Joe, and NBC’s Nightly News, and has been covered extensively in prominent publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and New York Times. He has written on travel, sport, entertainment, and history, and his writing has appeared in Esquire, Outside Magazine, Men’s Journal, the New York Times, TIME, Newsweek, Slate, The Daily Beast, and the Washington Post.

This event is a partnership with Nicola's Books and includes a book signing. Books will be for sale at the event.

Film & Discussion: Grooming a Generation

Thursday October 26, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 6 - adult

The 2017 documentary "Grooming a Generation" is a 30-minute film directed by Andy Sacks about local Ypsilanti barbers and their innovative program to get young customers reading:

"Read to your barber while you get a haircut. Get a two dollar refund. Low tech, high concept. No apps, no devices, no software. Just a 25 minute hair appointment, a shelf of books, and an adult who truly cares."

Join us for a screening of this captivating film, followed by a panel discussion with Emmy Award-winning director Sacks and some of the barbers who appear in the film.

Author Julia Turshen Discusses Her Book “Feed the Resistance”

Friday October 27, 2017: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event will be recorded

From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes "Feed the Resistance," a practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes.

As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table to talk and plan. These dishes foster community and provide sustenance for the mind and soul, including a dozen of the healthy, affordable recipes Turshen is known for, plus over 15 more recipes from a diverse range of celebrated chefs.

With stimulating lists, extensive resources, and essays from activists in the worlds of food, politics, and social causes, "Feed the Resistance" is a must have handbook for anyone hoping to make a difference.

Julia Turshen is a writer who lives in upstate New York, the author of "Small Victories" and numerous other cookbooks. She hosted the first two seasons of Radio Cherry Bombe and has written for Vogue, Bon Appétit, Food & Wine, Saveur, SELF, T Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and Lucky Peach.

This event is a partnership with the University of Michigan Library and Literati Bookstore and will include a book signing. Books will be for sale at the event.