Ages 18+.

The Affordable Care Act: Evolution of Senior Health

The idea of Senior Health has evolved since the creation of Medicare in 1965. The passing of the Affordable Care Act has further changed health care for seniors. Part of the 2013 MLK symposium, this presentation will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2013 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm at: the Turner Senior Resource Center. Jacquetta Hinton will be presenting and this free event includes lunch.

Comic Artists Forum with Cartoonist and Children’s Book Illustrator Dani Jones

Sunday, January 6 | 1:00-3:00 PM | Downtown Library | 4th Floor Meeting Room

Via Skype, cartoonist Dani Jones will tell us about the joys, challenges, and tricks of juggling work as both a comics creator and as a children's book illustrator.

Dani has created and published her own comics stories, My Sister, the Freak, an ongoing webcomic, and Frosty the Gourdman, a Halloween short story comic. She recently wrote and illustrated the picture book, Monsters vs. Kittens for Stan Lee's Kids Universe and has illustrated other picture books including The Best Mariachi in the World, and Elfis, A Christmas Tale.

Join the Forum to get fresh ideas for your next comics or graphic novel creation. Drawing supplies are provided, so drop in to draw, learn, and network with other cartoonists.

Suicide Awareness: Dawn Farm Education Series

According to the Center for Disease Control, suicide was the tenth leading cause of death for all ages in 2010. Suicide is also preventable. If you or someone you care about are looking for information & support about suicide, you may want to attend this Dawn Farm Education Session about suicide prevention. This program will raise awareness of the signs of suicidal thinking and describe ways to offer support and obtain help for people with addiction who may be contemplating suicide. AADL has a number of books on this topic, as well.

Talking Books Narrator Roy Avers

Listen to a fascinating interview with acclaimed talking books narrator Roy Avers at 8pm, Wed. Sept. 26, on Books and Beyond. Avers, 63, has made his living as a businessman, sings bass in the Louisville Opera, and he has also narrated more than 300 books of many genres for the National Library Service. I know one Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled patron who will listen only to books narrated by Roy! As long as she hears his voice, no matter what the book is about, it will be greatly enjoyed. So tune in to learn what makes Roy Avers so unique. Just visit the Books and Beyond Room and enter your first and last names on the sign-in screen, or contact Marcia Moses at 734-495-1496, mgmoses@comcast.net.

What is a PASREP and How do I Get One?

Have you ever heard of PASREP? To qualify for this program you must be a Michigan resident and meet the following PASREP eligibility requirements: Have a functionally significant disability and are employed or have an offer of employment working a minimum of 24 hours per week & earning at least minimum wage. A PASREP helps break the barrier to going back to work by assisting with out of pocket costs. This can help bridge the funding gap caused by lost benefits. PASREP recipients receive reimbursements for personal assistance expenses. Contact your regional representative for more information about this program.

Addiction 101

The 2012-13 Dawn Farm Education Series begins this month with the first of its series Addiction 101. Presented by James Balmer, this session will examine the dynamics of drinking and drug use; addiction as a brain disease and the basic recovery process. All programs are free and ALL are WELCOME. Tuesday, September 18 from 7:30-9:00 PM at the SJMH Education Center

Doc Watson, the heart and soul of bluegrass guitar music, has died

Doc Watson, whose lightning-speed flatpicking style of guitar playing befuddled those who have tried to emulate it and who brought new life to folk music, died yesterday In Winston-Salem, NC, following complications from colon surgery.

Blinded when he was one, Doc Watson's first instrument was the harmonica. A few years later, at age 10, his father gave him a banjo and a neighbor gave him guitar lessons.

He eventually graduated to the electric guitar, playing with a rockabilly bind with an unreliable fiddle player. To fill the fiddle gap, Doc Watson figured out how to translate that sound to his guitar.

In the 1960s, Ralph Rinzler, a prominent folkie, encouraged Watson to go back to the acoustic guitar. Watson immediately became a hot commodity on the folk music circuit.

Toward the end of the 60s, Merle Watson, Doc's teenage son, joined his dad for a wonderfully successful run, fueled by their performance on Will the Circle Be Unbroken?, the million-plus album by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

Doc Watson's career was nearly derailed by his grief over the death of Merle in 1985, the result of a tractor accident.

Watson, who earned eight Emmys despite his deeply ingrained modesty, was 89 years old. His was the second death to rock the North Carolina and the national music world. Beloved Earl Scruggs died in March.

Cancer Survivors' Day Celebration

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is pleased to announce its 18th Annual Cancer Survivors' Day Celebration. The event takes place this Sunday, June 3rd from 1:00-3:30 at the Morris Lawrence Building on the campus of Washtenaw Community College. Presenting will be Lori Hope, motivational speaker & cancer survivor. There will also be exhibits & information, light refreshments & door prizes! To register, complete this form or call 734-998-7071.

National Library Service in Novel Form

The novel Liberty Lanes by Robin Troy is a mostly lighthearted story of a group of elder residents in a small Montana town whose lives intersect through their three-times-a-week bowling league and their meeting a young reporter from a local newspaper. It’s a good read for the active social lives of the characters and how their friendships help them navigate one man's experience with the initial stages of dementia, relations with grown children, and budding romances. It also includes a first reference that I’ve come across to a character who is blind named Alastair who receives talking books from the National Library Service at the Library of Congress, which is what the Washtenaw Library for the Blind & Physically Disabled is all about. After all is said and done, not a line is bowled, but lines on friendship are on full display.

Check Out Our Large Print Materials!

Reader's Digest large printReader's Digest large print

You think large print is for when you’re old?
Not when you talk to the folks we’ve polled
Large print type’s great for reading outside
It lowers the glare so you’re not glass-eyed

For readers who don’t like to read too much
You can read large type while you do thus and such
16 point font if you have to ask
Is ideal for those who multi-task

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